American Journal of Psychology and Cognitive Science
Articles Information
American Journal of Psychology and Cognitive Science, Vol.1, No.3, Aug. 2015, Pub. Date: Jun. 30, 2015
Perceived Depression, Anxiety and Stress Among Dubai Health Authority Residents, Dubai, UAE
Pages: 75-82 Views: 1528 Downloads: 1023
Authors
[01] Monsef N. A., Health Affairs Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[02] Al Hajaj K. E., Family Medicine Residency Training Program, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[03] Al Basti A. K., Family Medicine Residency Training Program, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[04] Al Marzouqi E. A., Family Medicine Residency Training Program, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[05] Al Faisal W., Health Affairs Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[06] Hussein H., Health Affairs Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[07] Abdul Rahim W. M. S., Family Medicine Residency Training Program, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[08] El Sawaf E. M., Health Centers Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[09] Wasfy A. S., Statistics and Research Department, Ministry of Health, Dubai, UAE.
Abstract
Background: High level of perceived stress may cause: depression, burnout, anxiety, sleep disturbance, fatigue and substance abuse. Worldwide many studies were done on the prevalence of stress, anxiety and depression among resident doctors which showed increase in the prevalence of stress, anxiety and depression among this group. Objectives: To study the perceived prevalence of stress, anxiety and depression among resident doctors in Dubai Health Authority (DHA), and to study demographic, socioeconomic and residency related factors that affect their level. Methods: Cross sectional study was done among DHA resident from April 2012 to February 2013, population consisted of 216 resident doctors working in DHA hospital and peripheral clinics. Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS 21) was used as the main instrument of this research. Results: Response rate for residents participated in the study was 78.2%. Prevalence of stress was 42%, prevalence of anxiety was 57.4%, and the prevalence of depression was 63.3%. Stress was more prevalent among residents who wanted to change their specialty (69.7%) and difference from those who doesn't want to change their specialty was statistically significant (p value 0.000) and odd ratio (0.262). Depression was more prevalent among residents who have income less than 10,000 Dirhams (69.1%) and the difference from other groups was statistically significant (p value 0.046). Conclusions: The perceived prevalence rates of depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms among residents as studied by DASS were high. Establishing residency counseling office is suggested to deal with residents problems in way that supports their needs and leads to a best working environment.
Keywords
Depression, Anxiety, Stress, Resident Doctors, Dubai
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