Clinical Medicine Journal
Articles Information
Clinical Medicine Journal, Vol.2, No.2, Apr. 2016, Pub. Date: Mar. 18, 2016
Distribution of Haemoglobin Variants, ABO and Rh Blood Groups in Blood Donors Attending Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital
Pages: 20-24 Views: 850 Downloads: 723
Authors
[01] Garba N., Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Bayero University, Kano, Kano State, Nigeria.
[02] Danladi S. B., Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Bayero University, Kano, Kano State, Nigeria.
[03] Abubakar H. B., Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Bayero University, Kano, Kano State, Nigeria.
[04] Ahmad, S. G., Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Bayero University, Kano, Kano State, Nigeria.
[05] Gwarzo M. Y., Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Bayero University, Kano, Kano State, Nigeria.
Abstract
Background: AfricanCommunities constitute a major part of the population prone to many haematological disorders, such as haemoglobinopathies. The frequencies of abnormal haemoglobins (Hb), ABO and Rhesus (Rh) blood groups differ from one population to another. The aim of this study was to find the prevalence of hemoglobin variants, ABO and Rh blood group distribution among blood donors in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital. Methods: Standard cellulose acetate electrophoresis was used for the determination of Hb variants at pH 8.6, while haemagglutination techniques were used for the determination of ABO and Rh blood groups. Four hundred and twenty (420) apparently healthy blood donors comprising 418 (99.5%) males and 2 (0.5%) females with mean age of 30.29 years participated in the study. Subjects were tested for abnormal haemoglobin variants, ABO and Rhesus groups. Results: Normal haemoglobin Hb AA accounted for 304 (72.4%), followed by two other haemoglobin variants, Hb AS 114 (27.1%) and Hb AC 2 (0.5%) of the study population. The distribution of the various blood groups indicates that 42.9% (180) were blood group O, 114 (27.2%) were group A, 101 (24%) were group B while 25 (5.9%) were group AB. Rh D positivity pattern was 402 (95.7%) while Rh D negativity accounts for 18 (4.3%).Conclusion: This study showed a relatively high prevalence of hemoglobin variants in the study population. Thus, the findings can serve as part of counseling strategies which can assist intending couple in making informed decision, ultimately curb the proliferation of sickle cell trait and sickle cell disease in Nigeria.
Keywords
Blood Groups, Rhesus, Haemoglobin Variants, Sickle Cell Disease
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