Clinical Medicine Journal
Articles Information
Clinical Medicine Journal, Vol.1, No.3, Aug. 2015, Pub. Date: May 23, 2015
Post-Varicella Retrobulbar Optic Neuritis with Encephalitis in Immunocompetent Child: A Case Report
Pages: 70-73 Views: 1177 Downloads: 628
Authors
[01] Upasana V. Patel, Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, India.
[02] Ish Anand, Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, India.
[03] Anuradha Batra, Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, India.
Abstract
Optic neuritis as a complication of varicella infection is rarely encountered. We hereby report a case of a 3-year-old immunocompetent boy who presented with sudden bilateral vision loss with recurrent generalised seizures and myoclonus four weeks after eruption of lesions of chickenpox. Ophthalmologic examination revealed only light perception in both the eyes with normal fundus examination, but prolonged latency in both eyes on visual-evoked potential (VEP), suggestive of bilateral retrobulbar optic neuritis. Preceding clinical history of chickenpox, findings of VEP and concomitant neurological involvement supported the diagnosis of post-varicella retrobulbar optic neuritis. After receiving a short course of intravenous methylprednisolone followed by tapering dose of oral steroid along with anti-epileptics, the visual acuity normalised bilaterally six months later.
Keywords
Acyclovir, Chickenpox, Encephalitis, Optic Neuritis
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