International Journal of Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering
Articles Information
International Journal of Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering, Vol.1, No.3, Nov. 2015, Pub. Date: Sep. 26, 2015
Varietal Influence on Biological Properties of Algerian Light Figs (Ficus carica L.)
Pages: 237-243 Views: 887 Downloads: 686
Authors
[01] Leila Meziant, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Life and Natural Sciences, University of Bejaia, Bejaia, Algeria.
[02] Fairouz Saci, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Life and Natural Sciences, University of Bejaia, Bejaia, Algeria.
[03] Mostapha Bachir Bey, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Life and Natural Sciences, University of Bejaia, Bejaia, Algeria.
[04] Hayette Louaileche, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Life and Natural Sciences, University of Bejaia, Bejaia, Algeria.
Abstract
Figs are worldwide distributed and highly consumed at both fresh and dried state, especially in Mediterranean countries. They are known to provide many dietary elements and beneficial phenolic compounds that have good antioxidant properties. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of fig variety on the phenolic content and on two in vitro biological activities. Results showed significant differences among the six analyzed varieties for phenolic (217 to 342 mg GAE/100 g DW), and flavonoid contents (11.13 to 19.20 mg QE/100 g DW). The varietal influence was also obtained for the nitric oxide radical (NO°) scavenging activity (235.13 to 624.45 mg QE/100 g DW) and iron chelating potential (24.19 to 62.58%). Highly significant correlations were found between the NO° scavenging activity and contents of phenolic compounds (r = 0.72), and flavonoids (r=0.84), but no correlation was obtained for the ferrous chelating activity.
Keywords
Fresh Fig, Light Fig, Variety, Phenolic Compounds, Antioxidant Activity
References
[01] Bachir Bey M., Louaileche H. & Zemouri S. (2013). Optimization of phenolic compounds recovery and antioxidant activity of light and dark dried fig (Ficus carica L.) varieties. Food Science Biotechnology. 22: 1613-1619.
[02] Bachir bey M., Meziant L., Benchikh Y. & Louaileche H. (2014a). Deployment of response surface methodology to optimize recovery of dark fresh fig (Ficus carica L., var. Azenjar) total phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity. Food Chemistry. 162: 277–282.
[03] Bachir bey M., Meziant L., Benchikh Y. & Louaileche H. (2014b). Deployment of response surface methodology to optimize recovery of dried dark fig (Ficus carica L., var. Azenjar) total phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity. International Food Research Journal. 21 (4): 1477-1482.
[04] Benmeddour Z., Mehinagic E., Le Meurlay D. & Louaileche H. (2013). Phenolic composition and antioxidant capacities of ten Algerian date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cultivars: a comparative study. Journal of Functional Foods. (5): 346-354.
[05] Caliskan O. & Polat A.A. (2011). Phytochemical and antioxidant properties of selected fig (Ficus carica L.) accessions from the eastern Mediterranean region of Turkey. Scientia Horticulturae. (128): 473–478.
[06] Carranza-Concha J., Benlloch M., Camacho M.M. & Martínez-Navarrete N. (2012). Effects of drying and pretreatment on the nutritional and functional quality of raisins. Food and Bioproducts Processing. (90): 243-248.
[07] Decker E.A. & Welch B. (1990). Role of ferritin as a lipid oxidation catalyst in muscle food. Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry. (56): 674-677.
[08] Del Caro A. & Piga A. (2008). Polyphenol composition of peel and pulp of two Italian fresh fig fruits cultivars (Ficus carica L.). European Food Research and Technology. (226): 715-719.
[09] Djeridane A., Yousfi M., Nadjemi B., Boutassouna D., Stocker P. & Vidal N. (2006). Antioxidants activities of some Algerian medicinal plants extract containing phenolic compounds. Food Chemistry. (97): 654-660.
[10] FAO STAT. (2013). Statistics of the Food and Agriculture Organization. Web Site: www.faostat.org.
[11] Gorinstein S., Cvikrova M., Machackova I., Haruenkit R., Park Y.S., Jung S.J., Yamamoto K., Martinez Ayala A.L., Katrich E. & Trakhtenberg S. (2004). Characterization of antioxidant compounds in Jaffa sweeties and white grapefruits. Food Chemistry. (84): 503-510.
[12] Lim Y.Y., Lim T.T. & Tee J.J. (2007). Antioxidant properties of several tropical fruits: A comparative study. Food Chemistry. (103): 1003–1008.
[13] Marinova D., Ribarova F. & Atanassova M. (2005). Total phenolics and total flavonoids in Bulgarian fruits and vegetables. Journal of the University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy. 40 (3): 255-260.
[14] Melgarejo P., Hernandez F., Martinez J.J., Sanchez J. & Salazar D.M. (2003). Organic acids and sugars from first and second crop fig juices. Acta Horticultura. (605): 237-239.
[15] Moncada S., Palmer R.M. & Higgs E. A. (1991). Nitric oxide: physiology, pathophysiology and pharrnacology. Pharmacological Reviews. (43): 109-142.
[16] Nakilcioglu E. & Hisil Y. (2013). Research on the phenolic compounds in sarilop (Ficus carica L.) fig variety. GIDA. 38 (5): 267-274.
[17] Pietta P., Gardana C. & Pietta A. (2003). Flavonoids in Herbs. Chapter 2 in: Rice-Evans C.A. & Packer L. Flavonoids in health and disease. 2nd Edition Marcel Dekker, Inc. Pp 43-69.
[18] Pokorny J., Yanishlieva N. & Gordon M. (2001). Antioxidants in food Practical applications. First published Woodhead Publishing Ltd and CRC Press LLC. 380 p.
[19] Russo F. (2014). Phenolic and aromatic characterization of fresh and dried figs of the “Dottato” Italian cultivar in comparison to Turkish and Greek figs varieties. Doctoral thesis, University of Naples “Federico II”. 110 p.
[20] Shahidi F. & Naczk M. (2004). Phenolics in Food and Nutraceuticals. CRC Press: Boca Raton FL. 565 p.
[21] Singleton, V. L., & Rossi, J. A. (1965). Colorimetry of total phenolics with phosphomolybdic–phosphotungstic acid reagents. American Journal of Enology and Viticulture. 16, 144–158.
[22] Slatnar A., Klancar U., Stampar F. & Veberic R. (2011). Effect of drying of figs (Ficus carica L.) on the contents of sugars, organic acids, and phenolic compounds. Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry. (59): 11696-11702.
[23] Solomon A., Golubowicz S., Yablowicz Z., Grossman S., Bergman M., Gottlieb H.E., Altman A., Kerem Z. & Flaishman M.A. (2006). Antioxidant activities and anthocyanin content of fresh fruits of common fig (Ficus carica L.). Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry. (54): 7717-7723.
[24] Spanos GA. & Wrolstad RE. (1992). Phenolics of apple, pear, and white grape juices and their changes with processing and storage - a review. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 40: 1478-1487.
[25] Trad M., Gaaliche B., Renard C.M.G.C. & Mars M. (2012). Quality performance of “Smyrna” type figs grown under Mediterranean conditions of Tunisia. Journal of Ornamental and Horticultural Plants. 2 (3): 139-146.
[26] Velioglu Y. S., Mazza G., Gao L. & Oomah B.D. (1998). Antioxidant activity and total phenolics in selected fruits, vegetables, and grain products. Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry. (46): 4113-4117.
[27] Vinson J.A., Zubik L., Bose P., Samman N. & Proch J. (2005). Dried fruits: excellent in vitro and in vivo antioxidants. Journal of the American College of Nutrition. 24 (1): 44-50.
[28] Woodland, D.W. 1997. Contemporary Plant Systematics, 2nd edition. Andrews University Press, Berrien Springs, MI 610.
600 ATLANTIC AVE, BOSTON,
MA 02210, USA
+001-6179630233
AIS is an academia-oriented and non-commercial institute aiming at providing users with a way to quickly and easily get the academic and scientific information.
Copyright © 2014 - 2017 American Institute of Science except certain content provided by third parties.