International Journal of Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering
Articles Information
International Journal of Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering, Vol.1, No.3, Nov. 2015, Pub. Date: Sep. 26, 2015
Medicinal Flora on the Banaras Hindu University Main Campus, India
Pages: 222-236 Views: 1013 Downloads: 868
Authors
[01] Arvind Singh, Department of Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India.
Abstract
A study was undertaken to explore the medicinal flora of the Banaras Hindu University main campus, India, spreading over 1,350 acres of land area. A total of 415 medicinal plant species were recorded from the university campus, of which 404 plant species belonging to 308 genera and 96 families were represented by the Angiosperms, 6 plant species belonging to 5 genera and 3 families were represented by the Gymnosperms and 5 plant species belonging to 4 genera and 4 families were represented by the Pteridophytes. Fabaceae, Asteraceae and Malvaceae were the dominant families of the medicinal flora of the Banaras Hindu University main campus. The native medicinal plants dominated over the exotic medicinal plants, and the medicinal plants of perennial duration dominted over the medicinal plants of annual and biennial durations on the university campus.
Keywords
Banaras Hindu University, Medicinal Flora, Medicinal Properties, Medicinal Uses, Origin Status, Varanasi District
References
[01] Singh, A. (2010). Woody species composition of Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. Journal of Non-Timber Forest Products 17 (4): 453-472.
[02] Singh, A. (2011a). Natural vascular floristic composition of Banaras Hindu University, India: An overview. International Journal of Peace and Development Studies 2 (1): 13-25.
[03] Singh, A. (2011b). Exotic flora of the Banaras Hindu University main campus, India. Journal of Ecology and the Natural Environment 3 (10): 337-343.
[04] Singh, A. (2015). Observations on the vascular flora of Banaras Hindu University main campus, India. International Journal of Modern Biology and Medicine 6 (1): 48-87.
[05] Singh, R. L., S. L. Kayastha and K. N. Singh (1971). India: A Regional Geography. The Natural Geographical Society, Varanasi, India, pp. 1-45.
[06] Singh, R. P. B. and P. S. Rana (2006). The Holy City of Varanasi. NATCON-IASO-WFSOS, Department of Surgical Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India, pp. 49-61.
[07] Hooker, J. D. (1875-1897). Flora of British India. 7 Vols., L. Reeve and Co., London, U. K.
[08] Duthie, J. F. (1903-1922). Flora of the Upper Gangetic Plain and of the Adjacent Siwalik and Sub-Himalayan Tracts. 3 Vols., Govt. of India, Central Publication Branch, Calcutta, India.
[09] Bor, N. L. (1960). The Grasses of Burma, Ceylon, India and Pakistan, Pergamon Press, Oxford, U. K.
[10] Kirtikar, K. R. and B. D. Basu (1975). Indian Medicinal Plants 4 Vols. Bishan Singh, Mahendra Pal Singh, Dehra Dun, India.
[11] Dastur, J. F. (1951). Medicinal Plants of India and Pakistan. D. B. Taraporevala Sons and Company Ltd., Bombasy, India.
[12] Pandey, B. P. (1988). Economic Botany. S Chand and Company Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, India.
[13] Singh, V. and D. K. Jain (1989). Taxonomy of Angiosperms. Rastogi Publications, Meerut, India.
[14] Valiyathan, M. S. (1998). Healing plants. Current Science 75: 1122-1126.
[15] Tiwari, D. N. (2000). Report of the Task Force on Conservation and Sustainable Use of Medicinal Plants. Bulletin of Planning Commission, Government of India, New Delhi, India.
[16] APG III (2009). An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG III Botanical Journal of Linnean Society 161 (2): 105-121.
[17] Singh, A. K., A. S. Raghubanshi and J. S. Singh (2002). Medical ethnobotany of the tribals of Sonaghati of Sonebhadra district, Uttar Pradesh, India. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 81: 31-41.
[18] Singh, A. (2007). Boerhaavia diffusa: An over-exploited plant of medicinal importance in eastern Uttar Pradesh. Current Science 39 (4): 446.
[19] Singh, A. (2014). Trees of Terminalia arjuna needs protection on Banaras Hindu University main campus, India. Science and Culture 80 (1-2): 63-64.
600 ATLANTIC AVE, BOSTON,
MA 02210, USA
+001-6179630233
AIS is an academia-oriented and non-commercial institute aiming at providing users with a way to quickly and easily get the academic and scientific information.
Copyright © 2014 - 2017 American Institute of Science except certain content provided by third parties.