International Journal of Preventive Medicine Research
Articles Information
International Journal of Preventive Medicine Research, Vol.3, No.3, Jun. 2017, Pub. Date: Oct. 30, 2017
Early Detection of Visual Impairment among Schooling Kids, Dubai Experience, 2016-2017
Pages: 9-13 Views: 55 Downloads: 39
Authors
[01] Manal Mohammad Omran, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[02] Waleed Al Faisal, Health Affairs Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[03] Hamid Hussein, Health Affairs Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[04] Nahed Monsef, Health Affairs Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[05] Nusaiba Al Behandy, Health Affairs Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[06] Ayesha Altheeb, Health Affairs Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[07] Noora Elkouka, Noor Dubai Foundation, Dubai, UAE.
[08] Sulafa Fadl Elawad, Health Affairs Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
Abstract
Globally, uncorrected Refractive errors are the main cause of vision impairment in school children aged 4–17 years, and the prevalence of myopia is increasing dramatically. Objective is to identify the prevalence of vision impairment and associated refractive error among schoolchildren in grades 1, 5 and 9. A cross sectional study was carried out on randomly selected sample of 1719 students, age range (6-11 Years old). Three well-trained optometrists have carried out visual assessment. Assessment setting was four private schools in Dubai. Two clinic sets were provided by Noor Dubai Foundation mobile clinic (fully furnished with vision assessment equipment). The schools were visited during the period from Nov 2016 to Feb 2017. A Snellen 6/9 Visual Acuity Card A measuring tape - for measuring 6 meters distance. A torch light - for external eye examination Baseline data formats Referral forms. A kit bag to store all these materials and A poster with information on signs and symptoms of eye ailments and good eye health practices which will be permanently displayed in the schools. If the child was able to say or point out all the four directions of E in the visual acuity chart, the visual acuity was recorded as 6/9. If not, it was recorded as less than 6/9. The assessment reveals that about 96.1% from the total population of students were with normal vision. On the other hand 3.1% had mild myopia (-0.5 to -3.0), 0.7% moderate (-3.00 to -6.00) and only 0.1% had severe myopia (more than -6.0) requiring further medical attention. On assessing for hyperopia, it was noticed that 99.2% students were normal sighted, with 0.4% having mild hyperopia (-0.5 to -3.0), 0.4% moderate hyperopia (-3.00 to -6.00). Astigmatism was also been assessed for and results showed that about 89.6% of the assessed students were normal, 3.8% had simple astigmatism, 4.2% compound astigmatism and 2.3% had mixed astigmatism respectively. Visual impairments among schooling kids in Dubai are remarkably high with severe visual impairments are not uncommon among screened cohort. A childhood visual screening program needs to be developed and implemented at a wider scale, and effective interventions at primary, secondary and tertiary care levels should be recognized as health care system necessity.
Keywords
Visual Impairment, Population Based Screening, Private Schools, Students, Dubai
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