Journal of Agricultural Science and Engineering
Articles Information
Journal of Agricultural Science and Engineering, Vol.2, No.4, Aug. 2016, Pub. Date: Aug. 19, 2016
Early Growth Performance and Reforestation Potential of Acacia polyacantha on Two Different Soil Types: The Case of Jaji Village in Chiweshe, Zimbabwe
Pages: 31-35 Views: 752 Downloads: 275
Authors
[01] Nyamugure Tendayi, Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Agriculture and Environmental Science, Bindura University of Science Education, Bindura, Zimbabwe.
[02] Mudyiwa Silas Mufambi, Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Agriculture and Environmental Science, Bindura University of Science Education, Bindura, Zimbabwe.
[03] Sabunet Charles, Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Agriculture and Environmental Science, Bindura University of Science Education, Bindura, Zimbabwe.
[04] Chikorowondo Gift, Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Agriculture and Environmental Science, Bindura University of Science Education, Bindura, Zimbabwe.
[05] Mukumbe Peter, Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Agriculture and Environmental Science, Bindura University of Science Education, Bindura, Zimbabwe.
[06] Makuku Tapiwa, Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Agriculture and Environmental Science, Bindura University of Science Education, Bindura, Zimbabwe.
Abstract
There has been massive deforestation in Chiweshe communal lands which has led to aridness of the area. Mazowe Rural District Council wants to engage Chiweshe community in a reforestation program different from the past programs as it includes indigenous tree species. Acacia polyacantha was chosen as the indigenous species to be used and its performance in Chiweshe soils is not known hence the need for this study. The study aimed at assessing the early growth performance of Acacia polyacantha on two sites of Jaji village in Chiweshe, one with sand and the other with loam soils. A completely randomised design was used on each site. Initial height and root collar of the plants was measured on the planting day. The subsequent root collar diameter, height and survival rate of the plants in the two sites were monitored after every three months. The study showed that in terms of height and root collar diameter, A. polyacantha performed better in loam than in sand soils. There was no significant difference in the survival rate of the species in the two sites. Therefore, the study recommends the possibility of using A. polyacantha on either soil type for reforestation purposes.
Keywords
Degradation, Chiweshe, Indigenous Species, Acacia polyacantha
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