Journal of Environment Protection and Sustainable Development
Articles Information
Journal of Environment Protection and Sustainable Development, Vol.6, No.2, Jun. 2020, Pub. Date: May 26, 2020
Analysis of Landslide Vulnerability and Community Risk Awareness in Rwanda
Pages: 16-24 Views: 212 Downloads: 166
Authors
[01] Philbert Mugisha, Faculty of Environmental Studies, University of Lay Adventists of Kigali, Kigali, Rwanda.
[02] Aristarque Ngoga, Faculty of Environmental Studies, University of Lay Adventists of Kigali, Kigali, Rwanda.
[03] Jean Damascene Rutagengwa, Faculty of Environmental Studies, University of Lay Adventists of Kigali, Kigali, Rwanda.
[04] Abias Maniragaba, Faculty of Environmental Studies, University of Lay Adventists of Kigali, Kigali, Rwanda.
[05] Lamek Nahayo, Faculty of Environmental Studies, University of Lay Adventists of Kigali, Kigali, Rwanda.
Abstract
Landslides cause deaths, injuries, property damage and adversely affect numerous community livelihoods’ resources. This study spatially differentiated landslide vulnerability and assessed community risk awareness with case of Rulindo district in northern Rwanda. By using the Global Positioning System (GPS), an inventory map of 52 events was prepared from field surveys and historical record. Eight factors: elevation, slope angles, rainfall, land use and land cover, population density, possession of communication tools (computer, radio, television, landline and mobile phones), health centers and school attendance rate (nursery to university) were analyzed. These factors were selected by referring to literature review, field observation and expert knowledge. The Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) weighted the factors and Geographic Information System (GIS) spatially differentiated landslide vulnerability across the study area. The results indicated that areas recording high rainfall, population density, elevation and slope, insufficient health centers, poor land management are largely vulnerable to landslide. The community risk awareness assessed by questionnaire revealed that 32% of respondents can differentiate hazard types and their triggering factors, 25% don’t know anything about landslide causative factors. However, 48% can’t predict landslide occurrence while (91%) are willing to prevent landslide risk among them. This is a high number from which policies can build on to minimize risks among people. This study can help policy makers and partners to understand the required landslide hazard prevention measures for adequate community disaster preparedness and response as well.
Keywords
Landslide, Vulnerability, Community, Risk, Awareness
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