Journal of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering
Articles Information
Journal of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, Vol.1, No.4, Dec. 2015, Pub. Date: Nov. 12, 2015
Skin Disorders Inflicted Through Insect Invertebrates Along with Diagnosis and Treating of Cases
Pages: 233-240 Views: 794 Downloads: 642
Authors
[01] Muhammad Sarwar , Department of Entomology, Nuclear Institute for Food & Agriculture (NIFA), Tarnab, Peshawar, Pakistan.
Abstract
Skin disorders of humans can result from poor diet, nutritional deficiencies, toxins, bacteria or fungal infections, impurities in the blood, exposure to harsh chemicals, pollution, hard water, soap and detergents, and medications or too much sunshine. This set of recommendations is designed for pest control workers, aims to enhance their awareness of safety and health hazards, and advise them on precautionary measures so as to prevent any accidental poisoning or harm to health. Insects are arthropods of the class Insecta and comprise the most diverse and numerous class of the animal kingdom, and hence human contact with these is unavoidable. Exposure to biting or stinging insects or to their remains can range in severity from benign or barely noticeable to life threatening. Species of insects belonging to the orders of major medical importance are Hemiptera, Diptera, Siphonaptera and Hymenoptera, and the insect orders of minor medical importance are Coleoptera and Lepidoptera. Contacts with insects through their bites or stings can result in adverse reactions in humans that range from mild annoyance to anaphylactic shock and death in extreme cases. Mosquitoes, lice, fleas and bedbugs inject salivary secretions and venoms through specially adapted mouth parts for piercing and sucking blood, whereas bees, wasps and ants inject venoms through specialized structure the stinger, and symptoms of allergic reaction include pain, swelling of the throat, redness, itching or discoloration on skin at the site of bite or sting. All mosquitoes are regarded as annoying biting insects and many species are of public health concern, due to the ability to transfer a number of disease-causing microorganisms. General management measures include cooling the skin, application of calamine and antihistamine to reduce itching, antibiotics for secondary bacterial infection if anyone develops, and any specific treatment for disease transmitted as a result of the bites and stings by insects.
Keywords
Skin Lesion, Sting, Arthropod, Bite, Allergy, Irritation
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