Public Health and Preventive Medicine
Articles Information
Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Vol.2, No.1, Feb. 2016, Pub. Date: Apr. 14, 2016
Anxiety, Depression and Other Psychological Effects on Women After Induced Abortion
Pages: 1-5 Views: 3156 Downloads: 1037
Authors
[01] Bujar Obertinca, Instiutute of Forensic Psychiatry of Kosova, University Clinical Center of Kosova, Pristina, Kosovo.
[02] Myrvete Pacarada, Clinic of Gynaecology and Obstetric, University Clinical Centre of Kosova, Pristina, Kosovo.
[03] Albiona Beselica Beha, Clinic of Gynaecology and Obstetric, University Clinical Centre of Kosova, Pristina, Kosovo.
[04] Florim Gallopeni, Qeap-Himerer, Pristina, Kosovo.
[05] Niltene Kongjeli, Clinic of Gynaecology and Obstetric, University Clinical Centre of Kosova, Pristina, Kosovo.
[06] Astrit Gashi, Clinic of Gynaecology and Obstetric, University Clinical Centre of Kosova, Pristina, Kosovo.
[07] Valbona Blakaj, Instiutute of Forensic Psychiatry of Kosova, University Clinical Center of Kosova, Pristina, Kosovo.
Abstract
Emotional and psychological effects after abortion are common, they are experienced in varying degrees in every woman. Most common emotional and psychological effects after abortion are: repentance, anger, guilt and shame, loss of self confidence, feelings of loneliness, eating disorders, sleeping disorders, anxiety and depression. This study is transversal (cross - sectional study), based on two questionnaires, Beck anxiety questionnaire and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale questionnaires (EDPS). It was attended by 122 women after induced abortion from January to December of 2015 in Gynecology and Obstetrics Clinic in Prishtina. Abortions were induced for fetal anomalies, maternal various diseases and as unwanted pregnancies. Incidence of induced abortions in Prishtina in 2015 was 12:47 per 1000 pregnant. ; Abortions where induced until the 10th week of pregnancy, by the decision of the couple 38.5%, anomalies of the central nervous system 23.9% genetic syndromes 6.5%, multiplex fetal anomaly 6.5%, abnormality of the urinary tract was 4.9% the anomaly of the gastrointestinal system 4.9% (n = 6), other feto-maternal pathology 4.9%, maternal chronic disease 3.4%, the cardiovascular system anomalies 2.4%, musculoskeletal system anomalies 2.4%, placental pathology 1.7%. Most frequently psychological effects were: sleep disorders 22.13% (n=27), repentance 25.40%,anger 36.06%, feelings of guilt and shame, 27.4%, the loss of faith itself 34.42%, feelings of loneliness 29.5%, food disorders 29.5%, anxiety 30.32%, depression 27.86%. These emotional effects can have a negative effect on planning pregnancy and holding other pregnancies.
Keywords
Induced Abortion, Psychological Effects, Kosovo
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