American Journal of Food Science and Health
Articles Information
American Journal of Food Science and Health, Vol.5, No.1, Mar. 2019, Pub. Date: Mar. 19, 2019
Determination of Minerals in Five Different Vegetables Collected from Two Different Markets in Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
Pages: 10-14 Views: 125 Downloads: 49
Authors
[01] Samuel Oluyemi Adefemi, Department of Chemistry, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria.
[02] Olajide Ayodele, Department of Chemistry, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria.
[03] Olayinka Abidemi Ibigbami, Department of Chemistry, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria.
[04] Mayowa Akeem Azeez, Department of Chemistry, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria.
[05] Abiodun Folasade Akinsola, Department of Chemistry, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria.
Abstract
This study was conducted to ascertain the status of vegetables consumed within Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. The concentrations of some metals (Zn, Cu, Mg, Fe, Pb and Cd) were determined in five (5) vegetable samples which were freshly bought from two different markets: Iwororko and Oja-oba markets in Ekiti State, Nigeria with a view to determining their suitability for consumption. The samples were subjected to analyses using standard analytical procedures. Each sample was chopped into small pieces and dried, the dried sample was weighed and digested using HClO4 and HNO3, the digested sample was cooled and filtered into 100 mL volumetric flask which was made up to the mark using deionized water. The concentration of metals in each sample was determined using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS Buck scientific 210 VGP). The following ranges of results were obtained from Iworoko sample: Ca (37.23 -102.21 mg/L); Mg (15.43 - 77.53 mg/L); Fe (1.73 - 3.97 mg/L); Cu (0.06 - 0.11 mg/L); and Zn (0.11 - 1.84 mg/L). While the results from Oja-oba were as follows: Ca (23.52 - 61.20 mg/L); Mg (7.53 - 17.98 mg/L); Fe (1.5 - 47.58 mg/L); Cu (0.07 - 4.93 mg/L); and Zn (0.15 - 0.74 mg/L). Cadmium and lead were not detected in all the samples. The levels of detected metals were compared with international standards set by FAO/WHO, it was observed that the obtained results were within the permissible limits of FAO/WHO, this indicated that all the vegetables samples analysed were suitable for consumption.
Keywords
Vegetables, Heavy Metals, Concentration, Environment, Accumulation, Anthropogenic, Pollution, Irrigation
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