Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities
Articles Information
Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities, Vol.5, No.4, Dec. 2019, Pub. Date: Dec. 27, 2019
Evaluation of Colleges of Education “OUT” Programmes in Ghana
Pages: 475-480 Views: 123 Downloads: 48
Authors
[01] Cecilia Ofosua Odame, Department of Languages, Seventh Day Adventist College of Education, Asokore-Koforidua, Ghana.
[02] Bismark Kwasi Osei, Department of Social Science, Seventh Day Adventist College of Education, Asokore-Koforidua, Ghana.
[03] Veronica Serwaa Ofosu, Department of Languages, Seventh Day Adventist College of Education, Asokore-Koforidua, Ghana.
[04] Wisdom Blackson Agbanyo, Department of Languages, Seventh Day Adventist College of Education, Asokore-Koforidua, Ghana.
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the “OUT” programme section of the Colleges of Education in Ghana. The study adopted descriptive survey research design. The study was carried out in three out of six colleges of education in the Eastern Region of Ghana. The population of the study were mentees, mentors, link tutors, community leaders, headteachers, principals and directors of education. Stratified and random sampling techniques were used to select the respondents of the study. Questionnaire was the main instrument used for the data collection in the study. Findings of the study revealed that, some of the challenges on the OUT programme included accommodation problems for mentees, inadequate allowances for mentees, immoral lifestyle of some of the mentees, poor mentee-community members’ relationship, wrong accusations and financial problems. It is therefore, recommended that accommodation should be provided for mentees on the OUT programme. Community members should provide accommodation free of charge or at reduced rate for mentees at their various stations. It is also recommended that, all examinations for mentees should be written before they leave campus for the OUT programme.
Keywords
Evaluation of Colleges of Education “OUT” Programmes in Ghana
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