Physics Journal
Articles Information
Physics Journal, Vol.4, No.2, Jun. 2018, Pub. Date: Jul. 26, 2018
Comparative Studies of Radiological Hazards Indices Resulting from Boreholes and Local Wells H2O at Selected Locations in FCT Abuja, Nigeria
Pages: 17-22 Views: 272 Downloads: 136
Authors
[01] Nimat Omowumi Abudulazeez, Department of Science Infrastructure, National Agency for Science and Engineering Infrastructure (NASENI), Abuja, Nigeria.
[02] Hezekiah Agogo, Department of Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Baze University, Abuja, Nigeria.
[03] Emmanuel Osiewundo Ojo, Department of Science Infrastructure, National Agency for Science and Engineering Infrastructure (NASENI), Abuja, Nigeria.
[04] Fidal Bashir, Department of Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Baze University, Abuja, Nigeria.
[05] Fadeke Afusat Abdulhamid, Department of Engineering Infrastructure, National Agency for Science and Engineering Infrastructure (NASENI), Abuja, Nigeria.
Abstract
H2O, regardless of its sources is extensively used by man, animal and for our environment. The presence of natural radio nuclides in H2O results in internal and external exposure to man and its environment. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the concentration of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs): namely 238U, 232Th and 40K and the radiological hazards parameters in the water samples collected from different sources (boreholes and local wells) at selected locations in the Abuja, FCT. Twenty four H2O (boreholes and local wells) samples were collected from seven different locations in the studied areas. In order to measure the specific activity in these samples, Gamma-ray spectrometer was used for the analysis of the samples. The result of 238U, 232Th and 40K showed that the activity concentration values of various samples analyzed varied from (1.06 ± 1.07 to 5.44 ± 0.05, 2.04 ± 0.30 to 8.04 ± 0.87, and 4.41 ± 4.40 to 26.39 ± 2.37) for borehole and (2.06 ± 1.23 to 8.91 ± 1.13, 5.89 ± 0.98 to 9.47 ± 0.89 and 30.37 ± 4.96 to 61.78 ± 5.58) for the local well respectively. From the results it is clear that the mean concentration of 238U, 232Th and 40K are well below the safety limit of 35, 30 and 400Bq/l respectively as recommended by United Nation Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). The Absorbed Gamma Dose Rate (AGDR), the mean Annual Effective Dose Equivalent (AEDEq), Annual Gonnadial Dose Equivalent (AGDEq) in the studied areas fell below the standard set safe limits recommended but Excess Lifetime Cancer Risk (ELCR) was higher than the safe limit in both borehole and local well H2O. The hazard indices studied and compared revealed that local well contained double the amount observed in borehole. The findings of the study showed that the radiation exposure level (ELCR) originating from both boreholes and well H2O of the mining sites were significantly high and could be harmful to human consumption and health.
Keywords
Comparatives, Radiological Hazards, Borehole, Local Well, NaI (Tl) Detector, Gamma-Ray Spectrometry
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